Maria Dimitropoulos

Maria primarily works on Greek art and architecture in the Archaic and early Classical periods; her dissertation research will focus on intra-familial conflict in ancient Greece. 

Classical literature plays a key role in Maria’s art historical and archaeological research. She presented a paper in the 2018 Cleveland Symposium entitled Despots and Drama: Tyrants as catalysts for the spread of Classical Greek Theater on the development of theater in Greek colonies from Athens to Magna Graecia, Macedon, and Asia Minor. Her interest in ancient theater continues into its modern reception. She is currently part of a research initiative conducting archival research at Columbia and Barnard on Dr. Margarete Bieber's life and contributions to ancient art history and Greek drama. Specifically, she is focusing on her role as Costume Chair in the Barnard Greek Games, the early 20th century revivals of athletic and musical competitions modeled after Greek festivals. 

Maria's research on the 20th century reception of ancient Greece also addresses the political dimension of archaeology, and especially its role in identity formation in emerging nations. She presented on Nation-Building in 20th century Greece: Converging the Ancient with the Modern in 2017 at the University of Toronto. More recently, she is part of a joint research project with the Department of Histoire de l’art et Archéologie of the Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonneon on 20th century university collections of classical antiquities (and their narratives) in the United States. 

Maria has experience teaching Elementary and Intermediate Greek. She has been a T.A. for language and history courses, including a global core class on Egypt in the Classical World, as well as courses in Greek and Roman Art and Archaeology. 

Maria received her M.A. in Classical Studies from Columbia in 2015 and B.A. in Classical Archaeology magna cum laude from the Macaulay Honors College at Hunter College in 2013. She has participated in numerous archaeological projects including the underwater archaeological survey at the Roman Port Sanisera in Menorca (2012), the excavations at Gournia, Crete (2013, 2014), and the Columbia excavations in Onchestos, Thebes (2014 - 2018) as a trench supervisor and researcher. She also traveled to Italy on a fellowship in May 2015 to expand a chapter on South Italian vase painting in her MA thesis, "Violence, Sensuality, and Humor in Rape? The Ajax-Kassandra Episode." Email Maria Dimitropoulos.