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The interdepartmental Classical Studies Program (CLST) at Columbia University (contact information here) brings together faculty from Art History and Archaeology, Classics, History, and Philosophy. Students in the program pursue a Ph.D. or an M.A. in Classical Studies, meeting requirements in three fields relevant to the study of Greek and Roman antiquity as well as the larger Ancient Mediterranean. Together with the Center for the Ancient Mediterranean, Classical Studies is the home of a vibrant community of scholars working in ancient studies at Columbia University. Learn more…

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Classical Dialogues: Stoics and Skeptics on Cataleptic Impressions by Tobias Reinhardt

As part of its Classical Dialogues series, the Classical Studies Graduate Program CLST at Columbia University is pleased to welcome Tobias Reinhardt from Corpus Christi College, University of Oxford. On Friday February 19 2016, 11am-1pm, Tobias Reinhardt will discuss his recent work on Academic Skepticism. Comments by Benjamin Morison (Princeton University) and Charles McNamara (Columbia University). Location: Schermerhorn Hall 934, Columbia University.

Stoics and Skeptics on Cataleptic Impressions by Tobias Reinhardt

The Stoics are famous for their view that there are so-called cataleptic impressions, namely, impressions “from what is” and “imprinted and sealed” in accordance with what is. The skeptics are equally famous for arguing against this. As the skeptics aim to show, there could always be an impression that is indistinguishable from the presumed cataleptic impression, and still false. In a well-known anecdote, a Stoic is presented with an apple. In accepting the apple, the skeptics say he accepted that this—what he saw in front of him—is an apple. And yet it was a wax apple! Along these lines, the debate revolves around the question of whether two impressions can be such that no one, not even a wise person, would be able to keep them apart, even though one of them presents the world as it is while the other is false. The precise moves in this debate are highly contested. Reinhardt offers a new reconstruction, which is part of his large-scale project on Cicero’s Academica.

In its Classical Dialogues series, the interdepartmental Classical Studies Graduate Progam CLST at Columbia University invites authors of recent work in ancient studies that is exemplary for the kind of study that CLST aims to foster. All faculty and students at Columbia and beyond are cordially invited. CLST students are required to read carefully at least one chapter or article in advance and prepare questions and comments for discussion.

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Classical Dialogues: Killing Mummies–On Inka Epistemology and Imperial Power by Terence D’Altroy

As part of its Classical Dialogues series, the Classical Studies Graduate Program CLST at Columbia University is pleased to welcome Terence D’Altroy, Loubat Professor of American Archaeology in the Department of Archaeology at Columbia University. On Friday December 4, 9-11am, Professor D’Altroy will discuss his recent article “Killing Mummies: On Inka Epistemology and Imperial Power.” Location: Schermerhorn Hall 934, Columbia University. Please see below Terence D’Altroy’s abstract:

killing-mummies_terence-daltroy_by-jens-haas_web

The simultaneous close of the last Inka dynastic war and the Spanish invasion of the Andes were punctuated by two moments of iconoclasm – the incineration of two royal mummies, one by the Inkas and one by the Spaniards. Neither action was wanton, but they require radically different explanations. The Christians were most concerned with blasphemy and diabolical utterance, while explaining the Andean act requires exploring their concepts of vitality, death, landscape, and causality. This paper focuses on the latter topic, examining what the Inkas thought they were accomplishing by destroying the living icon of a deified ancestor.

In its Classical Dialogues series, the interdepartmental Classical Studies Graduate Progam CLST at Columbia University invites authors of recent work in ancient studies that is exemplary for the kind of study that CLST aims to foster. All faculty and students at Columbia and beyond are cordially invited. CLST students are required to read carefully at least one chapter or article in advance and prepare questions and comments for discussion.

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Classical Studies Student Mentoring Program

We are very pleased to announce the Classical Studies Student Mentoring Program. The program is designed to support incoming students as well as international students, who transition into the US academic system. Mentors meet regularly with incoming and international students, offer peer advice about course selection, CU’s libraries and special collections, CU’s resources, assignments for classes, academic writing, translating Latin/Greek into English, and more. Each semester, two of our students receive an additional stipend of $1,000 and are appointed as Incoming Student Mentor and International Student Mentor.

Mentors for 2015/16
Incoming Student Mentor Fall: Giulia Bonasio
Incoming Student Mentor Spring: Zachary Herz
International Student Mentor Fall: Grant Dowling
International Student Mentor Spring: Evan Jewell

In addition, the graduate student community organizes a Buddy Program for incoming PhD students: each PhD student who joins the program is assigned a ‘buddy’ who offers advice, support, and suggestions for an excellent start at Columbia and in the Classical Studies Program.

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